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Monday, July 6, 2020 | History

4 edition of Lecompton Constitution found in the catalog.

Lecompton Constitution

Lecompton Constitution

speech of Hon. John Sherman, of Ohio, in the House of Representatives, Jan. 28, 1858 : on the admission of Kansas as a state under the Lecompton Constitution.

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Published by Printed at the Congressional Globe Office in [Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Slavery -- United States -- Speeches in Congress,
  • Kansas -- Politics and government -- 1854-1861 -- Speeches in Congress

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesSpeech of Hon. John Sherman, of Ohio, in the House of Representatives, Jan. 28, 1858
    Series19th-century legal treatises -- no. 27168.
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Pagination8 p.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16318737M
    OCLC/WorldCa18064662

    Speech of Hon. W. L. Underwood, of Kentucky, against the admission of Kansas as a state under the Lecompton constitution. (Washington, ), by Warner Lewis Underwood (page images at HathiTrust) Kansas and the Lecompton constitution. Speech of Hon. I. Washburn, jr., of Maine. Delivered in the House of representatives, January 7, The Lecompton Constitution was rejected on August 2, , by a vote of 1, to 11, While the debate shifted to the national scene, delegates for the territory's third constitutional convention were elected on March 9 and assembled in Leavenworth on Ma

    The Lecompton Constitution gave the voters of Kansas the right to decide only whether more slaves would enter the territory. Senator Stephen Douglas attacked the Lecompton Constitution, arguing that the voters of Kansas should have the right to decide whether any slaves could enter their territory. Lecompton Kansas and the Constitution Hall were at the center of the run up to the Civil War. The displays and information provided at the Constitution Hall help to bring those events to life and provide a personal experience that puts you in the middle of it all/5(33).

    Constitution Hall curator, was his descriptive submission that won Constitution Hall a place in the final balloting to become an 8th Wonder of Kansas. --John Peterson Wichita State University history professor, and prolific Kansas history author, Craig Miner’s new book on the Lecompton Constitution, “Framing Freedom,” will be. The constitution was rejected after intense national debate and was one of the prime topics of the Lincoln-Douglas debates. The controversy contributed to the growing dispute soon to erupt in civil war. The Lecompton Constitution failed, in part, because the antislavery party won control of the territorial legislature in the election of


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Lecompton Constitution Download PDF EPUB FB2

Lecompton Constitution, (), instrument framed in Lecompton, Kan., by Southern pro- slavery advocates of Kansas statehood. It contained clauses protecting slaveholding and a bill of rights excluding free blacks, and it added to the frictions leading up to the U.S.

Civil War. Though it was rejected in a territorial election (January Lecompton Constitution book Lecompton Constitution was a controversial and disputed legal document of the Kansas Territory that became the focus of a great national crisis as the United States split over the issue of slavery in the decade before Lecompton Constitution book Civil it is not widely remembered today, just the mention of "Lecompton" stirred deep emotions among Americans in the late s.

In disagreement, Congress sent the Lecompton Constitution back to the voters of Kansas, where this time it was roundly defeated at the polls. In the end, Kansas became a free state in One of the most controversial, confusing and famous of these events was the writing, voting on and submission to Congress of the Lecompton Constitution by Pro-slavery advocates in Lecompton, Kansas in and the subsequent response to that document by President James Buchanan in a message to Congress in February,   The Lecompton Constitution, the second constitution drafted for Kansas Territory, was written by proslavery supporters.

The document permitted slavery (Article VII), excluded free blacks from living in Kansas, and allowed only male citizens of the United States to vote. ↑ This constitution was adopted at a convention which met at Lecompton, September 5,adjourned for a month, and completed its labors November 7, It was immediately forwarded to President Buchanan.

The Lecompton Constitution () was one of four proposed constitutions for the state of was written by pro-slavery people.

It included parts to allow slavery in the state. It also had parts to not include free blacks from its bill of rights. Kansas and the Lecompton constitution Paperback – Decem by Israel Washburn (Author) See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions.

Price New from Used from Paperback "Please retry" $ $ Author: Israel Washburn As presented to Congress, the Lecompton Constitution provided for the admission of Kansas as a slave state The fanatical abolitionist John Brown made his first entry into violent antislavery politics by.

Bleeding Kansas Program Series Announced Constitution Hall State Historic Site, Historic Lecompton, 2pm Sundays. Suggested donation $3 per adult. A series of talks and dramatic interpretations on the violent territorial and civil was of Kansas and the nation, Excerpt from Speech of Hon.

James H. Hammond, of South Carolina, on the Admission of Kansas, Under the Lecompton Constitution: Delivered in the Senate of the United States, March 4, Ple, bonafide, being the only way in which all the people can assemble and act : James Henry Hammond.

The Lecompton Constitution was the second of four proposed constitutions for the state of Kansas (it was preceded by the Topeka Constitution and was followed by the Leavenworth and Wyandotte Constitutions, the Wyandotte becoming the Kansas state constitution).

The document was written in response to the anti-slavery position of the Topeka Constitution of James H. Lane and other free-state. Start studying Dred Scott, Lecompton Constitution, John Brown and Harper's Ferry, The Election, and Secession. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.

The Lecompton Constitution is easiest to understand when examined through the series of steps needed to create a state constitution. That is how this lesson explores the constitution. It is also important to remember that in regard to the Lecompton Constitution the issue is popular sovereignty even though the controversy is slavery.

Genre/Form: Academic theses: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Cook, William Adelbert. History of the Lecompton constitution. (OCoLC)   The Senate approved the Lecompton Constitution over the near-fatal opposition of Stephen Douglas, who felt the document’s procedural history made a mockery of “popular sovereignty.” The House voted to require a new referendum in Kansas in which voters could vote up or down on the entire Lecompton Constitution.

Constitution Hall in Lecompton, Kansas. Following the violence in Kansas known as Bleeding Kansas, there was a question of whether the territory would be admitted as a free state or slave taking office inPresident James Buchanan appointed Robert J. Poll Book, Atchison, Lecompton Constitution Author: Adams, Franklin G.

Date: January 4, On January 4,by act of the free-state territorial legislature, the voters of K. were given a second chance to vote on the Lecompton Constitution. Lecompton Constitution. November 7, ARTICLE V. SEC. It shall be the duty of all civil officers of this State to use due diligence in the securing and rendition of persons held to service or labor in this State, either of the States or Territories of the United States; and the legislature shall enact such laws as may be necessary for the honest and faithful carrying out of.

Lecompton Constitution Hall, also known as Constitution Hall, is a building in Lecompton, Kansas that played a role in the long-running Bleeding Kansas crisis. It is operated by the Kansas Historical Society as Constitution Hall State Historic Site. History. Constitution Hall was constructed by Samuel J.

Jones, the pro-slavery sheriff tasked with keeping the peace in Douglas County in the on: Elmore St. between Woodson and 3rd Sts. lecompton constitution. When the Kansas territory was ready to seek admission to the Union inthe key issue was whether it would be a free state or a slave state.

The pro-slavery forces won control of the constitutional convention, which met in the town of Lecompton in September of that year.When they finished this Lecompton Constitution, they then applied for statehood as a slave state.

President Buchanan accepted the constitution immediately and welcomed Kansas into the Union. Inhowever, the Republican-dominated Congress refused to admit Kansas on the grounds that border ruffians had rigged the election.!

1! THE!!LECOMPTON!!CONSTITUTION! November!7,!!! PREAMBLE.!We,!the!people!of!the!Territoryof!Kansas,!byour! representativesin!convention!assembled,!atLecompton.